iSyllabus Advanced Year Two

The Modules - Year Two


A. Quran studies

1&2. The Word of God - Tafsir of selected Suras


Aims & Objectives: Through a detailed study of the commentary and selected sections of the Quranic text, this module will provide the student with an insight into the divine nature of the quranic message and the themes that make up the quranic text. The student will also be introduced to the special form and style of the quranic text through a study of classical and modern works of tafsir as well as through the methodology used by the most famous authorities of tafsir.


Building on the modules on Quranic Hermeneutical Axioms, special attention will be given to developing the students ability to make use of such universals maxims to form an understanding of the universal themes of the Quran as well as the thematic unity of individual chapters. The module will also look at the relationship between translation and quranic exegesis and the degree to which translation may act as vehicle to convey certain understandings of a section of the Quran over others.



B. Hadith studies

3. Comparative fiqh & hadith studies (Family law) [1]

Aims & Objectives: This module will cover comparative fiqh according to the four schools of law, looking at how the


Maliki, Shafi’i, Hanbali and Hanafi schools utilize the prophetic sunnah to arrive at rulings of fiqh.

Through a selection of pivotal hadith related to the fiqh of Family Law this module will allow student to understand the role of hadith literature in the science of fiqh, and how the same hadith sources sometimes lead to different legal rulings.


Topics covered: Triple divorce; Triple divorce in the early period of Islam; Triple divorce given at one time; Contested divorce; Jest in one’s pronouncements; That which is not counted as Talaq; Prohibitions of Ihdad; Rulings on Iddah; Leaving the marital home for a reason; Establishing lineage.



4. Comparative fiqh & hadith studies (Commercial law) [1]


Aims & Objectives: This module will cover comparative fiqh according to the four schools of law, looking at how the Maliki, Shafi’i, Hanbali and Hanafi schools utilize the prophetic sunnah to arrive at rulings of fiqh. Through a selection of pivotal hadith related to the fiqh of Financial Law this module will allow student to understand the role of hadith literature in the science of fiqh, and how the same hadith sources sometimes lead to different legal rulings.


Topics covered: Impermissible sale items; The prohibition on sale including uncertainty; The prohibition on two sales in one; Stipulations in sales; Option to annul a sale; Placing an embargo (hajr) against a debtor; A Loan given to accrue a benefit; Variant hadith on Usury; The sale of a debt for a debt; Salam sales; Equality in giving gifts to one's children.


C. Law and Jurisprudence


5. Islamic jurisprudence [1]

Analogy (qiyas) and the theory and practice of Equity (Istihsan)


The central place given in Islam to the science of the principles of Islamic law (usul al-fiqh) cannot be overstated. As a discipline, it has attracted the finest minds Islam has produced such as Imam al-Haramayn al-Juwayni, Al-Ghazzali and Ibn Rushd. It not only covers what sources, such as the Qur’an, sunnah and analogy, are to be utilized by scholars in providing answers to dilemmas facing Muslims, but also how these sources are used. The primary aim of usul al-fiqh, to arrive at the detailed rules of fiqh through an informed understanding of the source of Islamic law, will be demonstrated with reference to the various schools of Islamic law.


This module will cover detailed discussions amongst legal theorists on the central pillar of Ijtihad: Qiyas (Analogy) and its associated principles of Istihsan (Equity or Juristic preference) and Maslahah Mursalah (consideration of Public Interest). The interrelatedness of these concepts will be outlined and their relative function and importance explored.


6. Islamic jurisprudence [2] Auxiliary concerns in Usul al-Fiqh


This module will cover the discussions amongst legal theorists on the Auxiliary concerns in Usul al-Fiqh, starting with a completion of the remaining three sources of Sunni Law: ‘Urf (Local Custom), Istishab (Presumption of Continuity) and Sad al-Dharai’i (Blocking the means to harm). Thereafter, students will investigate the use and result of all the preceding sources with a look at the methodology used to resolve conflicting proofs from the sources, the classification of the resultant rulings from deliberations on the usul, and finally a discussion on the qualities of one undertaking independent legal reasoning (Ijtihad) and the condition thereof.


7. Muslim Family law [1]


Aims & Objectives: Building on the material covered in the iSyllabus course, this module will involve the reading and comprehension of the Muslim family code as applied in the Muslim world as well as detailed explanation on the day to day application of fiqh related to Marriage, Divorce and general Family Law.


The module will involve selected readings of a text that represents the end result of the codification and streamlining of the classical corpus of fiqh works on Muslim family law. In doing so, it will afford students an insight into the manner in which Islamic law adapted to the challenges inherent in the imposition of Western codes of law and how first the Ottoman empire and then the emerging Muslim majority nations incorporated Islamic law into their own legal structures. Topics covered include: Birth and its Consequences; Parentage; Custody; Fosterage; Maintenance of Relations; Capacity and legal representation; Bequests.


8. Muslim Family law & Inheritance


Aims & Objectives: This module will provide an introduction to the Islamic law of inheritance covering the basic categories of those who stand inherit from the deceased’s estate.


Sessions cover the following topics: Introductory matters related to inheritance - Male inheritors - Female inheritors - A principle regarding calculations - The Daughter - Paternal sister - Maternal brother - Wife - Husband - Grandfather - General Review - Practicing case studies.


9. Minority Fiqh studies [Law 3.05.S]


‘Muslim minorities face strong challenges on an individual level as they try to lead an Islamic life among an environment that adopts a materialistic philosophy.’ [Abdullah Bin Bayyah]

One development that has taken place in the backdrop of the presence of Muslim populations in lands that have majority non-Muslim citizens is what is referred to as ‘The Fiqh of Minorities’ (al-Fiqh al-Aqaliyyah).


For its proponents, this is a new area of Islamic law dealing those legal cases and issues which have widespread relevance and require urgent attention for Muslims living in a situation of being a minority since such issues are now considered to be unavoidable (Umum al-balwa).

There are two main objectives of Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt: one, to preserve the religious life and Muslim identity of Muslim minorities through the facilitation of a more applicable fiqh; two, to support Muslim minorities’ efforts to convey the message of Islam to their fellow citizens. The two objectives are combined in the following legal maxim which encapsulates the outlook of Fiqh al- Aqalliyyāt: ‘al-taysīr fī al- fatwā wa al- tabshīr fī al- daʿwa’ (facilitation in the issuance of rulings and propagation of Islam through proselytizing).

This module will take an in depth and nuanced look at the area of ‘The Fiqh of Minorities’ (Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt), looking at issues such as: The development of ‘The Fiqh of Minorities’ (Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt); Methodology of Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt; Fiqh al-Aqaliyyat and the issue of minorities rights; The main principles of Fiqh al- Aqalliyyāt; Debates on Dar al-Islam and Dar al-Harb; General criticisms of Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt; Difference between Fiqh al- Aqalliyyāt and Fiqh al-Nawazil; Is Fiqh al-Aqalliyyat really unique; Salafi scholars and Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt; Shaykh Ramadan al-Buti & Fiqh al-Aqalliyyāt.


The module will conclude with selected Case studies:


Fighting for non-Muslim Militaries against Muslims; Permissibility of Muslims’ permanent residence in non-Muslim countries; The wife in a marriage embracing Islam; Interest based mortgage loans; Inheritance from non-Muslim relatives.


D. Belief and Apologetics

Approaches to the philosophy of Religion [1]

10. The Ontological argument & The question of Evil.


This set of modules, touching on areas of concern in the Philosophy of Religion, seek to investigate the core dilemmas and debates around the areas of Religion and God from the perspective of religious practitioners, philosophers and scientists. It aims to present current thinking in the area of Religion and religious thought in a manner that enables Muslim students to navigate contemporary debates on religious affairs, allowing them to build and utilize knowledge of Muslim creed, theology and ethics to make their faith tradition relevant to modern religious discourse.


In doing so, they should be able to effectively frame such debates from within the Muslim intellectual tradition and suggest new thinking on the big ethical questions that are posed by society and how Islam can provide deep and engaging responses from both scripture and reason.


This module, the third of four on the Philosophy of Religion, will explore the last of the three major historical proofs for the existence of God - The Ontological argument. in specific, it will provide a study of St Anselm’s formulation of this proof, as well as the contemporary reworking of the Ontological proof by Dr Alvin Plantinga.


The module will also look at one of the most persistent arguments against the Christian conception of God: the Question of Evil: ANSELMʼS ONTOLOGICAL ARGUMENT; PLANTINGAʼS MODAL ONTOLOGICAL ARGUMENT; The Question of Evil: THEORETICAL & EXISTENTIAL PROBLEMS OF EVIL


The Philosophy of Religion

11. Science, Religious experience and the Afterlife


Aims & Objectives: This module addresses the important topic of the challenge of scientism to religious belief in terms of the epistemological questions it raises about the validity of religious belief itself. It will also look at the nature of religious experience and its bearing on providing justifiable religious belief. Lastly, the module will touch upon the issue of afterlife and how this informs the concept of the self.


12. Muslim Apologetics - Problematic in modern discourse on Islam

Following on from the previous module which dealt with the theme of Religious violence, this module covers a wide array of contentious issues used by Islamophobes to malign the Islamic faith. This is done through critical readings on the chosen topics in order to firstly verify the nature of the attack and secondly assess some of the responses to the same.


13 & 14 Formal logic and Logical fallacies


Aims & Objectives: This module will provide an introduction into Formal logic - the term “formal” referring to the form of the arguments in terms of words, premises and conclusions. In particular it will cover the first half of formal logic relating to comprehension (Taswir) of individual concepts, leading to an understanding of what a definition is and how it is constructed. This will be done by investigating what role significations (dalalat) have in speech and how these are used in conveying meaning. The module will give a overview the main core of Formal logic - affirmation (tasdiq), as well as ‘The Five skills’ (Sana’at al-khamsah).


The modules will go on to cover the various forms of logical fallacies as used in classical and contemporary discourse and will focus on the importance of constructing sound reasoning and identifying flawed reasoning.


E. Spirituality

15 & 16 Understanding the Path - The Hikam of Ibn Ata

Illah al-Iskandari


In this module, students will be taken through a careful study of one of the gems of Islamic spiritual literature, The Hikam of Ibn Ata Illah al-Iskandari. It will provide an outline of the path to gaining divine pleasure and the obstacles in that appear on the way to this. It will provide an outline of the path to gaining divine pleasure and the obstacles in that appear on the way to this. This study will be aided through one of the most accessible commentaries written on the Hikam, that of the Spanish scholar Ibn Abbad al-Rhondi as well as other commentary such as Iqadh al-Himam.

105 views
  • momentpinlogo_2x
  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • Twitter - Black Circle
  • YouTube - Black Circle
  • Instagram - Black Circle

© iSyllabus Scotland Limited (Non Profit), iSyllabus England Limited (Non Profit) and Solas Foundation 2019.

Privacy Policy  - Terms & Conditions